London property holds it’s own in a weak UK market

London property holds it’s own in a weak UK market

London once again defied the skeptics and remained on target for a 17% increase in value in 2007 despite falling prices in much of the rest of the country.

The Royal Institute of Chartered Surveyors reported that “house price growth remained negative for the second month in succession,” and “new instructions declined for the fourth consecutive month at the fastest pace since June.”

Having said that, London was the only region in their monthly survey to experience a rise in instructions, and according to the Financial Times House Price Index, “prices in London rose 1.1 per cent in August compared with July and the annual rate of growth accelerated to 17.6 per cent, from 17 per cent in July. This was almost double the pace of growth of the south-east, the area with the second-highest increases, where prices were up by 9.4 per cent over the year. The cost of the average home in the capital is £363,364, compared with the national average of £225,826.”

The FT index suggests that overseas demand, rising immigration and City bonuses are fueling the London price increases.

Some areas around the country were less fortunate with price drops reported in the North, East Midlands and Yorkshire & Humberside and stagnant prices in the North West, South West and East Anglia.

Whether or not London can maintain this continued growth in the face of credit squeezes, reduced mortgage lending and dropping prices in much of the rest of the country remains to be seen and many analysts are predicting a slow down or reversal before the end of the year. For the moment though, it looks as though London is shoring up the whole market.

Links:

The Financial Times

The Royal Institute of Chartered Surveyors

The Halifax House Price Index

The Land Registry House Price Index